Education

The Jock Marshall Reserve has been used for undergraduate teaching exercises and external ´┐╝collaborative education programs. Students are able to access an extensive range of facilities such as ´┐╝controlled temperature rooms in environmental laboratories, a network of pitfall traps to survey terrestrial animals, and a 1 ha lake with purpose built piers for aquatic surveys.

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Research

The Environmental Laboratories in Building 42 offer fully equipped tank rooms for aquatic based research, and outdoor aviaries with associated viewing opportunities. The network of outdoor aquatic mesocosms and ponds have been used extensively for fish biology experiments.

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Conservation

The reserve is approximately 3 hectares in area , including a 1 hectare lake. The land that the reserve sits on today has been valued for its natural and cultural importance for over 100 years, with historical records dating back to the early 1900's when the land that Monash University Clayton Campus now occupies was leased to the Lady Talbot Epilepsy Colony.

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History of Jock Marshall Reserve

The Jock Marshall Reserve was established in 1961 to provide a teaching and research resource for environmental studies on campus. The reserve was established by and named after the Foundation Chair of Zoology and Comparative Physiology Professor AJ 'Jock' Marshall.

Monash University is situated on land that was traditionally occupied by the Bunurong people from the Kulin nation. The landscape in Clayton has experienced two significant changes over the past 200 years. The first was the gradual transformation of the natural heathland by graziers, agriculturists and sand-miners. Following this period of vegetative change the area underwent a period of development, from rural to residential and industrial.

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